Äng | Photography

So Close So Far

The project „So Close So Far“ is a diptych. It consists of two parts - diorama and interaction. The theme concept is what we see and what we don't see while moving around in a daily life in metropolis. Scientists tell us that the human eye actually has a focal length of around 22 mm with an angle of view of at least 120 degrees. But the field of view of those two eyes overlap so we can sense distance based on parallax. We really can see clearly only in a certain portion of that vast field of view. When people talk about seeing things out of the corner of their eye they are alluding to the fact that our visual acuity falls off towards the periphery of what we “see”. If one pays attention only to the central portion, the angle of view we see clearly narrows down to the 40 to 60-degree range. In your brain, you don’t really see any specific angle of view. What you think you see is comprised of what is of interest. You are pretty much unaware of other objects much closer. After factoring in the processing performed by your brain, your actual field of view is irregularly shaped, not round as your lens projects or rectangular as your camera sensor captures. When I manipulate an image, I try to explain myself, what I have seen. By blowing it up, adjusting perspective, rearranging elements I get the minute and more subtle details to the forefront. When I see a still picture, I have time to observe its every moment. Like one of a Bosch´s paintings it becomes a world of my own. First part is a diorama “So Close So Far”. The viewer can step into a landscape scene with a collage of NY. That part represents a play with a human eye vision possibility and the borders of perception. Deconstruction of characters makes each part of the picture equally important, rediscovers it from a new side, puts a new spin on a familiar scene. The second part is a projection on the wall called “Another Time Different Space”. Anyone that lets himself to be scanned will be randomly placed in a white space, creating a group portrait. A lot of times what you see is not what you get. The story is evolving while we are watching and recognizing things and people. We question our subjective perception that based on our experience and view of life.